Offering: Red Berries

 

Frame:
Cedar driftwood (designed and made by Colin Hamilton of  Thuja Wood Art
Lace:
Enamelled copper and stainless steel wires 

Semi-precious stones and beads: 
Bamboo Coral,  Clear Quartz Crystal, Hawk’s Eye, Rudraksha Seeds

 Technique: handmade bobbin lace – TesseLace pattern

Dimensions in centimetres: h:43 x w:43 x d:5
Dimensions in inches: h:17 x w:18 x d:2

If cold winter months are good for something else than hibernating, it is for lacemaking. Long, dark nights offer quiet time for uninterrupted work and allow sustained focus that reaches almost a state of meditation.

Cocooning in my studio, I was looking for an idea for lace that would fit in one of Colin’s driftwood frames. Dried by sun and fresh air the wood feels so warm, as it is radiating energy collected over many summers. Just like standing cedar trees, the driftwood offers assurance that we, too, will survive yet another winter. Living on the West Coast of Canada for thirty years, I came to understand why cedar has been considered sacred by indigenous people.

majestic cedar tree in my backyard

An empty red cedar driftwood frame has been standing on the shelf in my studio for more than a year, patiently waiting for lace. Upon invitation, the images kept appearing, but none of them strong enough to stay and prompt me into action. One day, on a walk through fresh snow in Kwomais Point Park, I was amazed by dark lines of underbrush with embellishments of ice and red berries, set starkly against pristine white background. There is a lot of lace to be found in the forest, but rarely in such plain sight.  

I started to work on my next offering. Once again, my connection with Veronika Irvine and her  TesseLace worked miracles, and I was able to find the right grid and use the Circular Grid Templates for designing the mandala.

It worked so well that the piece was finished before the snow in the forest melted… It became my offering to the season that makes us revere cedar, to the beauty of snow and ice, and to the berries who know how to say ‘fertility’ like no other.

The Offering: Red Berries will be shown in juried exhibition ‘Just Gates’, organized by Arts Council of Surrey, in April 2019.

Copyright©2019. Lenka Suchanek. All rights reserved.

Meganeura


Material:
 stainless steel and enamelled copper wires
drift wood, crystal beads

 Technique: handmade bobbin lace – free form

Dimensions: 48 x 72 x 5 cm (19 X 28 x 2 in)

Meganeura is an offering to Gaia and her transformative powers.

Meganeura, a dragonfly’s ancestor from the Carboniferous period, symbolizes transformation, survival, and incredible ability of Earth creatures to adapt and evolve with the environment. Watching dragonflies and knowing that their progenitor Meganeura lived 300 milion years ago, always fills me with awe and reverence for this planet and all life it carries.

This offering is a prayer for us, people of this Earth, to listen to Gaia, and learn from her wisdom… before it is too late.

This work is listed for sale in my Way of Lace shop on Etsy.

 

Copyright©2018. Lenka Suchanek. All rights reserved.

Offering: West Coast Mandala

Frame:
Cedar driftwood (designed and made by Colin Hamilton of  Thuja Wood Art)
Lace:
Enamelled copper and stainless steel wires 

Semi-precious stone cabochons and beads (from centre):
Nephrite (BC jade), Almandine Garnet, Shell, Rose Quartz, Bamboo Coral, Rhodochrosite, Clear Quartz Crystal, Calcite, Blue Tiger’s Eye, Shell, Hematite

 Technique: handmade bobbin lace – free form

Dimensions in centimetres: 64 x 61 x 12 ( 4 cm without stands)
Dimensions in inches: 25 x 24 x 5 (2 inches without stands)

West Coast Mandala is an Offering to the magnificent Pacific Northwest nature.

In harsh climate of the temperate rainforest, human life has never been easy. Ancient people called upon spirit powers to receive guidance and protection. They were taught to live in harmony with the land and the ocean, and respect all plants and animals. This wise, timeless teaching still resonates on the West Coast.

The Offering: West Coast Mandala is presented in a frame made from red cedar driftwood, which carries the spirit of the tree of life, and creates a sacred space for reflection and meditation. In its centre, the mandala holds a cabochon of the B.C. jade, and radiates the energy outwards through the copper wire weave. Inner sacred geometry circle with semi-precious stones, coral and shell beads, represents the earth’s depths. Surrounding three currents symbolize underground, surface and ocean water bodies. Water brings fertility and abundance to the soil and to people, and they present offerings of flowers and fish. Fertile land is encircled by a protective range of the coastal mountains, which merge into the mist of the sky dome. From above, water motion, vegetation growth and people’s lives are governed by the moon cycle. All is connected and therefore in harmony with the timeless wisdom.

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This artwork is now exhibited in Talisman Gallery on Pender Island, BC.

Copyright©2018. Lenka Suchanek. All rights reserved.

Lace Art Show and Workshop

Treat yourself to a double lace event on Valentine’s Day!

two hearts

Bobbin Lace in Wire Workshop #2 concurrent with a Lace Art Show will offer a special opportunity for students to see and learn from displayed lace art. Objets d’art – metal lace wall art, sculpture and wearable art – will offer an insight to possibilities of wire medium in handmade lace and motivate students to further their skills and free their imagination.

Lace Art Show is open to lacemakers, lace lovers, neighbours and friends from 11am to 4pm.
Bring your Valentine!

 

 

 

 

‘It’s OK to be a snail!’

A new workshop for new lacemakers – designed with love and understanding, how difficult it can be to leave a comfort zone and start something new… such as lacemaking with wire. I remember clearly my excitement and fear many years ago, when I left the shore of the Old World and its beautiful, delicate fibre laces and ventured into unknown territory in life and lace. I also remember that the beginnings were sometimes hard and frustrating. I am happy to share things that learned along the way and I strive to present them gradually, in accessible and enjoyable form. Slowly, one stitch at a time – because lacemaking nowadays really is about the process. I look forward sharing the joy of creative lace with some of you in Ocean Park!

snail